Alien Encounters - Netflix

On Alien Encounters, scientists and sci-fi writers explore a hypothetical first-contact event between aliens and humans.

Alien Encounters - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2012-03-13

Alien Encounters - ExtraTERRORestrial Alien Encounter - Netflix

ExtraTERRORestrial Alien Encounter (often abbreviated Alien Encounter) was a “theater-in-the-round” attraction in the Tomorrowland section of the Magic Kingdom theme park at Walt Disney World Resort. It was a darkly humorous science-fiction experience that used binaural sound to achieve many of its effects. A warning outside the attraction's entrance alerted guests that it was intense and not intended for children under the age of 12, however its height requirement was 48" for guests. It opened briefly for previews on December 16, 1994, on the site of the former Mission to Mars attraction, but was ordered closed on January 12, 1995 for retooling by then-Disney CEO Michael Eisner who deemed it was not intense enough. It opened officially on June 20, 1995 as part of the Magic Kingdom's New Tomorrowland. Some Disney fans praised ExtraTERRORestrial Alien Encounter for its darker tone, in contrast to other Magic Kingdom attractions. It closed permanently on October 12, 2003. The attraction was replaced by Stitch's Great Escape!, which uses much of the same technology and set pieces.

Alien Encounters - Special effects - Netflix

Unlike the Stitch-themed replacement show, much of Alien Encounter took place in total darkness while the attraction operated on the guests' non-visual senses. Most of the effects came from individual units mounted on the shoulder restraints behind audience members' heads. The most common effects were binaural cues which came from the highly separated speakers arranged next to each ear. These speakers bolstered many of the other effects with foley, creating unique effects like positional audio from the monster, and created general atmospherics to keep the audience tense, including the murmuring and screams of other audience members, pink noise, and heartbeats. The theater's circular design allowed these positional audio effects to be particularly effective, as it prevented individual guests from perceiving that their experiences were not unique. Binaural sound effects and moving shoulder restraints suggest that the alien is moving through the chamber above the audience. When the alien was meant to be traveling on the far side of the room, “several banks of 1,800-watt-per-channel servo-driven subwoofers” repurposed from the previous attraction, Mission to Mars and transducers mounted in the seats made pounding vibrations meant to simulate the footsteps of a powerful monster. Warm moistened air was used gently, to simulate the alien breathing down your neck; and forcefully, to induce a more acute reaction from the audience. Water sprinklers and air blasters mounted in the row in front (like the ones used in Disney's “4D” movie theaters) were used to simulate the dripping of either the creature's drool or blood from an attacked worker in the scaffolding above the theater (played by a cast member carrying a flashlight using pre-recorded dialog) and to simulate the explosion of the monster in the finale when the blast shield does not close in time. Soft textile tubes had air blown through them, causing them to slap against the back of the head of the audience member. This was the most direct physical effect, used in conjunction with the hot air blowers and olfactory emitters to suggest the alien's tongue was licking the audience member's head. During lighted segments, the show used lasers, rear-projected screens repurposed from the previous attraction, Mission to Mars, and audio animatronics for the alien, S.I.R., and Skippy (both normal and deformed).

Alien Encounters - References - Netflix

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